Subscribers Only Sale — Everything 20% Off!

20% off everything in store with code: 20%FRIEND

We wanted to say “Thank You” to all of our newsletter subscribers with an extra 20% off of everything on our site until January 31st, 2019. And if you see a fur coat you like, those are all 30% off! But don’t wait! You only have until the end of the month for these great deals on true vintage style!

VINTAGE FUR COATS NOW 30% OFF! USE CODE: GIMMEFUR30%
EVERYTHING ELSE IN THE STORE IS 20% OFF FOR OUR NEWSLETTER FRIENDS! USE CODE: 20%FRIEND

 

30% off fur coats with code: GIMMEFUR30%

Vintage Winter Coat Sale!! — Up to 30% Off

Photos: Public Domain
vintage fur coats now 30% off! Use code: Gimmefur30%
Everything else in the store is 20% off for our newsletter friends! Use code: 20%Friend

Check out our selection of true vintage coats that are on sale now and see what your favorite one says about your personality in our article below:

Just wearing a true vintage clothes item, or an entire outfit, says a lot about you as a person. For one thing, it says that you have a unique and classic style. But it also says that you are consciously recycling to do your part for the environment. Which is pretty great if you ask us, but does our favorite vintage coat say more about our personalities? We think so…

The Fur Coat

Genuine Saga Mink Fur Coat
Blackglama Ranch Mink Fur Coat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elegant lavishness. A woman wearing a fur coat is graceful, demure and polished. Even when worn with a simple T-shirt and jeans, the look is cultured and luxurious.

Don’t miss your chance to get 30% off on these beautiful vintage fur coats in our online store. Use discount code: GIMMEFUR30%

Leather and Suede Coats

Black Leather Ladies Coat with White Fox Trim 1960s
Black Suede Jacket 1970s Italian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mellow rebel. There is hardly a more relaxed and cool vibe than you get from someone wearing leather or suede. It also carries a tinge of carefree rebellion (Think “Rebel Without A Cause”). Women who wear leather and suede are low-key and easy-going with a strong and independent side.

The Wool Coat

Black Textured Wool Swing Coat George Carmel 1950s
Gray Wool with Buttons Promenade 1950s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sensibly smart. While also having a sophisticated classiness to them, a wool coat is for the practical and they reflect a down-to-earth, intelligent woman.

The Trench Coat

Etienne Aigner Trench Coat 1970s
Jeanne Lanvin Paris Vintage Pheasant Feather Print Trench Coat 1960s-70s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inquisitive class. Trench coats are enduring, ageless and permanent. No matter what era they are from, or how big the collar is, they never seem dated. A woman who wears this classic coat is understated, chic and has an investigative and curious personality.

So, what do you think? Does your favorite vintage coat match your personality? Of course, there are many different types of coats and an unlimited number of different personality combinations. These are just a few fun ideas. (If you’d like to know more about what your clothes say about you, read this intriguing book, You Are What You Wear: What Your Clothes Reveal About You.)

And don’t forget to use your discount code at checkout before it expires on January 31st, 2019:

 VINTAGE FUR COATS NOW 30% OFF! USE CODE: GIMMEFUR30%
EVERYTHING ELSE IN THE STORE IS 20% OFF FOR OUR NEWSLETTER FRIENDS! USE CODE: 20%FRIEND

 

 

 

 

 

The Fashions of The Astronaut Wives Club

The Astronaut Wives Club

Missing Mad Men? Happily there’s a new way of enjoying some fabulous 60s fashions on-screen with the new series: The Astronaut Wives Club. The series is centered around the wives of the space-race astronauts who were catapulted into the public eye, and what makes it look so delicious? The costumes are designed by Eric Daman who made the cast of Mad Men look so fabulous!

Above from left: Trudy, Louise, Jo, Rene, Betty, Marge , Annie.

If you haven’t had a chance to see an episode yet here’s the fashion low-down on the different characters.

Also, we have many fashions from this era at our online stores:

The Best Vintage Clothing

BestVintageEver on Etsy

Catspajamasvintage on eBay

Betty Grissom

Betty The Astronaut Wives Club

Played by Joanna Garcia Swisher, Betty is an Indiana girl who wears (to quote Daman) a “frozen vegetable color palette” in yellows, greens and oranges and often compliments this with fruit and veg themed accessories which were hugely popular during the 1950s and early 60s.

Style File Betty

Dress| Brooch | Bag

Trudy Cooper

Trudy

Trudy is played by Odette Annable and is the most modern of the wives. She drives a sports car and is also a trained pilot and wears trousers and pedalpushers when it’s still considered daring.  She also has a penchant for tropical and tiki prints because she met her husband in Hawaii.

Trudy

Above from left: Dress | Dress

Annie Glenn

Annie The Astronaut Wives Club

Youngest of the wives, Annie (Azure Parsons – pictured in the pink dress 2nd from right) is the all-American girl next door.  Shy and modest she wears buttoned-up collars and muted pastel pinks and blues.

Annie

Above: Blouse, White Dress | Yellow Dress

Rene Carpenter

Rene The Astronaut Wives Club

Rene (Yvonne Strahovski) is the bombshell of the wives and loves statement prints and bright colors, especially if everyone is wearing pastels!

Style File Rene

From left: Dress | Dress | Swimsuit

Louise Shepard

Louise The Astronaut Wives Club

Louise (center above) is the most cosmopolitan of the wives and has a style similar to Jackie O: high fashion shapes in sharp black or pastel lavender, blues and greys.

Louise

Above from left: Dress | Dress

Jo Schirra (Zoe Boyle)

Jo The Astronaut Wives Club

Jo (left) is a typical society girl complete with pearls, white shoes and headband, and loves beige and muted colours. Team a dress like this with a string of pearls, a headband and some neat white gloves to get the look.

Style File Jo

Above: Dress | Pearls | Shoes

Marge Slayton (Erin Cummings)

Marge The Astronaut Wives Club

Marge’s style harks back to the 1940s gangster glamor in earthy tones and deep purples.

Style File Marge

Dress | Dress

 

 

A Brief History of Vintage Swimwear: From Baggy Knits to String Bikinis

You can buy swimwear in any style imaginable now, from the tiniest bikini to form-enhancing shape-wear swimsuits and even burqinis, but it hasn’t always been that way.  Here’s a brief history of modern swimwear, from it’s beginnings in the 1920s through to the 1970s.

1920s

The 1920s was the decade where swimwear first started to resemble the swimming costume we know today. The Twenties were a decade of female emancipation: long hair was bobbed short, hemlines got higher and higher and it got increasingly more acceptable for women to have careers. The new form-fitting swimwear reflected the spirit of the age. The style tended to be similar for both men and women, with a form fitted knitted tunic and shorts.

Swim suits tended to be made from wool jersey and suited the fashionable androgynous figure of the time.

Did you know: It was illegal in the US for men to swim with their chests exposed until the mid 1920s, and in some places this law lasted until the early 1940s!

Below: Maroon 1920s swimsuit with gold trim by G & M Gantner & Mattern Co. of San Fransisco.

1930s

Swimwear became a lot more feminine in the 1930s. The swimsuit evolved to be skirted, flared and much more flattering. Lastex (a stretchy elasticated cotton material) became fashionable and allowed for much more form-fitted styles which were popularized by Hollywood stars like Esther Williams. Two piece swimsuits and suits with cut-out panels were popular during the 1930s, although the bottoms were always high-waisted and wouldn’t show the navel.

Below: Original 1930s “bathing beauty” style swim suit, in a navy blue textured wool. It has a shaped bodice, a waistband, a short skirt and wool panty with unique braided straps fit into channels.

1940s

Nylon was invented in the late 1930s but because of the Second World War most nylon was used in the manufacturing of military supplies rather than in swimwear.

Corsetry was introduced into the swimming costume, by adding elasticated panels and boned bodices and materials used were mostlycotton or lastex.  People also made their own swimming costumes from whatever they had at home due to rationing and fabric shortages.

The first true bikini was unveiled by designer Louis Reard in Paris in 1946. Two-piece swimsuits had been worn in the past, but this was the first string bikini. Reard claimed that a true bikini would be small enough to pass through a wedding ring and it was seen as very scandalous at the time.

Below: Beautiful vintage 1940s blue cotton swimsuit with boned bodice, back zip and adjustable straps.

 

1950s

All in one swimsuits were the most popular style during the 1950s, especially since they now included built in bras and more support than ever. Strapless styles were fashionable along with bright tropical prints which just hadn’t been available during the wartime years.

Below: Lovely vintage 50s cotton bathing suit from Catalina, in a great abstract print of brown and gold with black and white accents. It has a “Bubble butt”, so called because the bottom and legs are elasticized to create that look.

1960s

Nylon and Lycra really molded the shape of 1960s swimwear. The introduction of those fabrics allowed for much stretchier form-fitting styles, and swimsuits became more risque to compete with the bikini.

In 1964 Rudi Gernreich designed the topless ‘monikini’ which caused great controversy and was even denounced by the Vatican.

Below: Vintage 1960s stretch bikini with round formed hard cups in the bra; it is adjustable with buttons. Bottom has boy leg style, pull on by Catalina (who founded the Miss USA and Miss Universe beauty pageants as a way of promoting their products).

 

1970s

By the 1970s the shape of swimsuits was pretty much the same as now, but with new features like front zippers and mesh panels add extra sex appeal.

Below: A 1970s “Wet Look” swimsuit which looks like liquid chocolate! Its a one piece maillot with a white metal zip front, and boy leg styling.

Feeling inspired? Why not grab yourself an original vintage swimsuit in store now?

Vintage Brooches and How to Wear Them

Brooches and pins have fallen out of fashion a little in recent years, but they were incredibly popular in the 1950s. Nothing adds a vintage touch to your outfit like a pin on your lapel, and the right brooch can turn an ordinary outfit into something quite spectacular.

Of course you don’t just have to wear a brooch on your coat, there are lots of other ways to wear a vintage pin.  You can use it to keep a neck scarf tied, pin one to a hat or wear a chunky brooch at the neck of a button-up shirt (in place of a tie). Wear one on your jeans cuffed up. Pin one to your fabric handbag.

Or how about pinning one in your hair to decorate a chignon, onto a ribbon headband for a fabulous hairpiece or even pin one onto a clutch-bag to add a dash of instant glamour!

Here are some of my favourite vintage brooches in store at the moment. How would you wear them?Send me your ideas for using a vintage brooch to accessorize your wardrobe!

 

And we have lots more! You can see our full range of vintage brooches here,